Find Us Online!

_____________________

icon-facebook googlemapsicon soundcloud-3-xxl 07f0d7b69ef071571e4ada2f4d6a053a-instagram-icon-background-by-vexels

October 29, 2017: A Tour Through the Gardens
Perhaps because I was born in Kent, the garden of England, and grew up in a family of gardeners, one of my favorite things about being at All Souls is the chance to get my hands in the dirt. It makes me happy to see a neatly edged flowerbed. Passersby often stop to compliment our gardens, and in some cases go on to attend All Souls.?

by Jennifer Crier Johnston

Perhaps because I was born in Kent, the garden of England, and grew up in a family of gardeners, one of my favorite things about being at All Souls is the chance to get my hands in the dirt.  It makes me happy to see a neatly edged flowerbed. Passersby often stop to compliment our gardens, and in some cases go on to attend All Souls.

While the gardens have gone through many changes during my time here, the most memorable have been in the back garden, where once asphalt sloped down to weed grass and a bed of Canna lilies. Back in the ‘90s, my then-Garden Guild co-chair Christopher Lethbridge and I developed a design that eliminated the asphalt, replacing it with a railroad tie terrace and flagstone patio.

When we built the building extension a few years ago, this garden had to be demolished save for the flagstones – now reset.  The new back garden, with glossy Distylium shrubs filling the terraces, takes little time to weed, so our main attention is spent on keeping the rest of the garden under control.

As the cold weather sets in, it’s the season to prepare our gardens for winter and make decisions about longer-term maintenance. The front center bed, planted with a weeping cherry tree and Nandina, Knock Out, and other roses, is fairly easy to maintain (and we will shortly be cutting back all the Knock Out roses to within a few inches of their life!). The side azalea and rose bed will be cut back for winter. The front bed, replete with liriope and hydrangeas, will only need a little pruning, but the long bed, with rosebushes and other plants struggling to survive under the tall trees, needs a complete renovation so our small band of gardeners will be able to keep up.

I hope this gives parishioners some idea of the work it takes to keep our gardens beautiful and welcoming. Our next open gardening sessions, for anyone interested in joining me in getting their hands dirty, are Saturday, October 28 and Saturday, November 11, starting at 9 am. And while I would love to see more people gardening, I also recommend using our gardens as a perfect space for meditation, quiet reading, or gentle conversation with your friends or the birds!

Last Published: October 18, 2017 1:48 PM
© Copyright , All Souls Episcopal Church - Washington, DC. All rights reserved.
Empowered by Extend, a church software solution from